On Monday’s impeachment proceedings, the House Republicans shared their own evidence collected in their reports and came to a crucial decision. They made the conclusion that the evidence pulled to date does not support the impeachment efforts against Trump, and should not result in removal from office.

The report included a 123-page report backing this conclusion that read, “The evidence presented does not prove any of these Democrat allegations, and none of the Democrats’ witnesses testified to having evidence of bribery, extortion, or any high crime or misdemeanor,”.

The report was timed to be revealed to the public before the majority Democrat’s own impeachment report, which could be assumed to rebut the Republican’s statements.

In the past two weeks, we have seen the grueling impeachment hearings led by the House Intelligence Committee. We have seen all of Schiff’s called – and approved – witnesses explaining what they felt had happened in regards to President Trump pressuring Ukrainian President Zelensky to investigate other political officials.

The committee is expected to vote Tuesday, where the Democrats will submit their final report before sending the documents to the Judiciary Committee.

Wednesday is expected to be the first public hearing held by the Judiciary Committee.

More from Fox News:

House Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Devin Nunes, R-Calif.; Oversight Committee Ranking Member Jim Jordan, R-Ohio; and Foreign Affairs Committee Ranking Member Michael McCaul, R-Texas, penned the minority report, which has been reviewed by Fox News. In it, they broadly defend the president’s actions in the face of accusations he withheld military aid and a White House meeting as leverage to pressure Ukraine to launch a probe involving the Bidens.

“The Democrats’ impeachment inquiry is not the organic outgrowth of serious misconduct; it is an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system,” the Republicans wrote.

They added: “This impeachment inquiry and the manner in which the Democrats are pursuing it sets a dangerous precedent.”

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At the center of the impeachment inquiry, which began in September, is Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, in which he asked for an investigation into Joe Biden’s efforts to oust a prosecutor who had been looking into Ukrainian natural gas firm Burisma Holdings, where son Hunter Biden served on the board. That call prompted a whistleblower complaint, and, in turn, the impeachment inquiry.

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