The Daily Wire reports that the charges against Owosso Barber Karl Manke have been dropped by Michigan state prosecutors.

Manke opened up shop on May 4, violation Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s lockdown order.

Misdemeanor charges have been dropped against Manke for violating health orders.

“Our client is thrilled and pleased that he has been vindicated,” Manke’s attorney David Kallman stated.

The Supreme Court ruling was 4 to 3 ruling spiked Whitmer’s authority to call emergency declarations over the coronavirus pandemic.

“We conclude that the Governor lacked the authority to declare a ‘state of emergency’ or a ‘state of disaster’ under the [1976 Emergency Management Act] after April 30, 2020, on the basis of the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, we conclude that the [1945 Emergency Powers of the Governor Act] is in violation of the Constitution of our state because it purports to delegate to the executive branch the legislative powers of state government – including its plenary police powers – and to allow the exercise of such powers indefinitely. As a consequence, the EPGA cannot continue to provide a basis for the Governor to exercise emergency powers,” the court declared.

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The Daily Wire reported, ‘Whitmer called the ruling “deeply disappointing” and said that it’s putting Michigan at risk for a resurgence of the coronavirus after “I have done everything in my power to protect our seniors, small businesses, and first responders from the worst public health emergency in over a century.”

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“Today’s Supreme Court ruling, handed down by a narrow majority of Republican justices, is deeply disappointing, and I vehemently disagree with the court’s interpretation of the Michigan Constitution,” Whitmer said in a statement. “Right now, every state and the federal government have some form of declared emergency. With this decision, Michigan will become the sole outlier at a time when the Upper Peninsula is experiencing rates of COVID infection not seen in our state since April.'”

Whitmer managed to put many of her lockdown regulations back in place, citing vague precedent of gubernatorial powers from the 1918 pandemic.